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Who @ 50

"go forward in all your beliefs and prove to me that I am not mistaken in mine"

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19 Weeks to 50: The Also People
Human Nature, McCoy
hammard wrote in who_at_50
We're now into the top 20 of my 50th Anniversary countdown of aggregated poll results for Doctor Who Books, TV Serials & Audio Dramas, with number 19:

19. The Also People



Doctor: 7th (Sylvester McCoy)
Companions: Benny, Roz & Chris
Aliens: The People
Synopsis:
The Doctor decides they all could use a holiday so he brings them the world of The People, a race so advanced they have a non-aggression pact with the Time-Lords. Unfortunately, with the Doctor even a vacation isn’t restful, as a murder, an all-powerful computer and a genetically engineered killer all interrupt their relaxation.
Why is it so well loved?
1. It is a brilliant exercise in world-building, creating an entire civilisation from scratch in one story.
2. Aaronovitch’s prose is beautiful and chock full of hilarious one-liners.
3. But at its heart this is a character piece, where all the regulars are shown in a new light.
Statistical Snippet
In this top 50, Bernice Summerfield is the most popular companion only to appear in the spin-off media. Chris is the second most and Roz comes in joint third.


X-Posted from Doctor Who


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Ohhh, will definitely put this on my list of 'must-read'!

*HUGS*

It is great! Unforntunately, because of that, it's the first of the virgin novels to get rather pricey, currently selling for about £20 second-hand.

Curiosity, joint-third with who?

Fitz and Anji from the 8th Doctor novels. [Who, completely OT, I'm convinced are my best friend and my wife... which secretly makes me a timelord ;)]

Edited at 2013-07-13 07:33 am (UTC)

Yay! I've never read a single novel but I already love Fitz :)

I consider this book to be one of the best examples of sci-fi world-building out there, and I don't just mean within Doctor Who.

Good one. Maybe it's the age I was reading them at, but I generally prefer the NAs over the EDAs (except when they're being "dark'n'edgy" purely for the sake of it, which to be fair is quite a bit of the time), and as others have said the main thing this one has going for it is its worldbuilding and the light it sheds on the various characters. Mind you, I am generally a big fan of Aaronovitch's Who writing from Remembrance of the Daleks onwards - too bad there wasn't more of it (I understand he had some major problems with writer's block, which I can only sympathise with).

I generally prefer the NAs over the EDAs (except when they're being "dark'n'edgy" purely for the sake of it, which to be fair is quite a bit of the time)
That kind of sums up my feelings. The VNAs I think are stronger books but I prefer the character work in the mid-period EDAs (The Burning-Time Zero). Then again I probably prefer the character stuff in the mid-period VNAs (No Future-Shakedown) as well.

I am generally a big fan of Aaronovitch's Who writing from Remembrance of the Daleks onwards - too bad there wasn't more of it (I understand he had some major problems with writer's block, which I can only sympathise with).
Yeah I really like his stuff too, he has such an amazing ear for dialgoue and inventive ideas. I remember reading back in 2010 that he couldn't get any of his scripts off the ground and was actually working behind the counter in Waterstones.
I'm sure he's very happy now being a best-selling fantasy author instead. :)
Slightly OT but have you ever listened to his Blake's 7 audios? You can listen free on spotify and him and Marc Platt did amazing work there as well.

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